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Troop JLT Course Page Three


Author:  Gary Malicki

JUNIOR LEADER HANDBOOK
Chapter 1

"THERE ARE SOME LEADERS IN THE TROOP WHICH ARE ELECTED...SOME ARE APPOINTED"

You never know when you'll be called upon to step into a 'Leadership' position. You may or may NOT see it coming. There are times when adults need to promote a Scout to a Staff or Patrol Leader position if the situation calls for the move and there is no time to prepare for it. Adult leaders are constantly reviewing your performance as Scouts. That's why it's a good thing to learn that THERE'S A RIGHT TIME AND PLACE FOR EVERYTHING.

Let me share with you a great quote I borrowed from www.kudu.net that I think is important to stress to your Training group any time you feel it appropriate:

While Scouts should not be expected to 'parade' their services, it would be helpful if Scout Leaders, parents, and others would encourage boys in the doing of Good Turns, and recognize the difference between normal household and other chores, and actual Good Turns. Selfishness is almost a universal evil. Certainly it is overcome by the Scout Program, which is based upon the development of service for others, and the Daily Good Turn is an important factor in the development of a habit of service and attitude of mind which offset a tendency to selfishness.
James E. West, 1928


PATROL COOKING AT JLT CAMP

When we camp with our whole Troop every month it's difficult to do true Patrol cooking because we average 30 or more boys at each outing. We're very lucky to have a very good Troop cook whose experience includes full time cook at Cub Scout resident camp. As a rule, the boys eat first, then the adults. AT THE JLT GRADUATION, HOWEVER, the Patrols do cook their own meals and the adult leaders (Trainers) eat first as their guests.

Two days before we go, we take both Patrols shopping for food. We guide them a little bit but mostly let them do it. (We did have to step in once to stop one group from purchasing a prepared shrimp platter they wanted for a snack). Originally, we told them that the cost of the weekend depends on them on what they want to spend. Now, we limit it to about per person and give them more of a suggested menu. Remember we're dealing with 12 and 13 yr olds and although they're capable of a lot they still need guidance.
This year (our graduation campout will be held in early June) they'll be cooking on light weight backpacker stoves. (The one I like right now is the Coleman Feather 442 Dual Fuel stove). A good breakfast would be bacon & eggs, sandwiches for lunch and, perhaps, the just-add-water dehydrated packaged meals. (Mountain House is a brand I like with many to chose from).
One thing we've learned is that you don't want to be wasting too much time on meals especially with a full camp schedule.

We think it's important to take the time in one of your Jr. Leader Training classes to review the position of Troop Guide and use that as an opportunity to show them how they can help build the Troop and make it even stronger. In our case, our Troop went through a rapid growth spurt and following the formula below helped us keep the new boys by going out of our way to make them feel comfortable and welcome. You can use the information below to teach this concept:


TEACHING A JLT CLASS ABOUT THE TROOP GUIDE POSITION:
"The Troop Guide will be at least a First Class Scout. The Scoutmaster, with the advice of an Assistant Scoutmaster for the new Scout Patrol, appoints a Jr. Leader who is mature enough to work with new Scouts. The Scoutmaster expects the Troop guide to be their friend or big brother. Right away, as the Troop Guide, you'll set out to make certain the older Scouts REMEMBER what is what like to be the new guy. You'll want them to help you make the new Scouts feel welcome and part of the Scouting family. This means no teasing or intimidation".
Junior Leader Handbook Chapter 4

REGARDING NEW SCOUTS:
1) Make him feel welcome as soon as possible - Very often a boy will come into the Troop knowing only one or two people or no one at all. No matter who it is, you have to respect the COURAGE of that person.
2) WITH A LARGE GROUP, IT'S EASY TO GET LOST IN THE SHUFFLE - You don't have to be a Troop Guide to make sure this doesn't happen. In the Troop, as in different social situations, people form friendships and sometimes forget about or just don't notice someone new. You have to be AWARE of when someone new joins and do everything you can to make the new Scout feel like he's part of the group right away!
3) IMAGINE YOURSELF COMING TO ONE OF OUR MEETINGS OR CAMPOUTS AND NOT KNOWING ANYBODY - At one time, most of you did. Since this class is mainly made up of Scouts who have been with us for a while...what are some of your memories of when you first joined?

IF YOU DON'T FEEL WELCOME, YOU PROBABLY WON'T LAST LONG
IT'S VITALLY IMPORTANT TO MAKE A GOOD FIRST IMPRESSION
IT'S VITALLY IMPORTANT NOT TO FORM CLIQUES
TALK TO THE NEW GUY...HELP HIM ADVANCE.

POWER OF PERSUASION is critical in Leadership

It's important for an effective leader to be an effective persuader. Every day each of us engages - both conciously & unconciously in trying to change someone's mind. In communicating with friends or family, this act may be as simple as 'asking for what you want'.
Persuading begins with listening & keen observation. Focus on the other person's wants & needs & tailor your conversation to help them achieve their goals.
A healthy dose of emotion, conviction & sincerity, coupled with logical argument built around the other person's needs & desires will stand the best chance of carrying the day.
Make good 'eye contact' & don't clutter your message with "ums" & "uhs". Use relaxed gestures, smile & stand up straight. Strong & consistent communication skills will give you an excellent shot of being heard all the way through-even if the person you're speaking to is initially opposed to the ideas you are presenting.
Sometimes, even after your best effort at persuading, the person may tell you they won't change their mind. Re-state your point & re-visit the issue in a few days. Tenacity is often the 'secret weapon' of influencing other people.
(Trainers...ask the group this question) "How many of you have ever gotten your way with your parents even after they said NO"?


One of my favorite quotes relates directly to goal setting: "If you don't know where you're going, is doesn't matter which road you take." Moreover, if you do not know where you are headed, you may or may not get there. BUT you'll never know for sure.

Why? Because you had no specific direction, no target, no desired outcome.

As leaders, we are charged with guiding a group toward the realization of their full potential. It is impossible to do that without having some idea of where the group desires to go. Thus, as leaders, we facilitate the setting and accomplishing of goals. This involves both individual and group, or collective, goals. Accordingly, in order to be effective leaders, we must understand the nature of goals and goal setting, recognize the importance of setting goals both for our groups and ourselves, and how to go about setting goals.

Peter Drunker, an accomplished analyst of leadership skills, defines leadership in this way: "Leadership is not a dynamic personality--that can just as well be a glib tongue. It is not "winning friends and influencing people"--that is just flattery. Leadership is lifting a person's vision to higher sights, the raising of a person's performance to a higher standard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations."


G.E.A.R. - what does it mean?
Not long ago, there was a boy in our Troop who received a phone call telling him he was going to be the SPL for summer camp (most of our regular Staff wouldn't be going that year - that can happen)...he drew a deep breath and said, "WOW"! A little overwhelmed by the idea but willing to give it a try. We believe his participation in JLT gave him more confidence & ended up doing a pretty good job.
The Scoutmaster reviewed his performance throughout the week & let him know what he was doing right and wrong. Here's where G.E.A.R. comes in:

G.et into your job

E.xpect the unexpected

A.ccept criticism

R.eflect on your training

...sounds alot like life, doesn't it?
Keeping this one word in mind ANYTIME you need to step into a Leadership role will make the job easier & less stressful. REMEMBER IT ALWAYS!

PEER PRESSURE & TROOP LEADERSHIP

As you enter adolescence, all of you will share one common occurrence --- the experience of transition. There's no middle ground in these experiences. They'll either be successful and lead to happiness or the experiences will be troublesome and lead to failure.

Most people think (especially parents) that peer pressure is the reason for negative behaviors in young teenagers but the reality is that peers are necessary and very important in helping adolescents make successful transitions:

How can you help each other as peers, be more successful in troop leadership?

PEERS CAN AND DO ACT AS POSITIVE ROLE MODELS (Lead by example)
PEERS CAN AND DO DEMONSTRATE APPROPRIATE SOCIAL BEHAVIORS (Always keep in mind you're working with boys of different ages)
PEERS LISTEN TO, ACCEPT AND UNDERSTAND THE FRUSTRATIONS, CHALLENGES AND CONCERNS ASSOCIATED WITH BEING A YOUNG TEENAGER.

If all of you really understand this and you develop into Troop Leadership together, you will be more supportive of each other, which is necessary in being an effective leader.

Peers provide an opportunity for young teens to meet their needs, to feel capable, to belong, to be respected and to have fun! You'll find that sometimes the adult leaders may bring you down in some moment of decision-making --- that's when you have to rely on each other for strength of character so you can go forward on not dwell on negatives.

Right here and now you're being trained for a time in the future that may bring some of you together on Troop Staff.I hope this information helps you understand each other a little better. When you're working with the Troop, keep whatever's happening in school,IN SCHOOL. Keep whatever's happening among you in the street, ON THE STREET

Remember to STAY FOCUSED ON YOUR LEADERSHIP POSITION.


Other Pages you May Like
More Training Tips
Troop JLT Course Page Five
Troop JLT Course Page Three
Contact Page
Court of Honor Ranks Ceremonies
Troop JLT Course Page One
 


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